CHICAGO'S RAILROADS/GOOGLE MAPS

Google Maps has this cool feature, which allows anybody to create custom maps where meaningful locations can be indicated. These maps are zoomable, and satellite views are available.

The complex network of railroads in Chicago, the railroad center of the nation, can be a challenge to untangle. But these maps can help sort it all out.


RAILROAD MAPS (CHICAGO AREA)

Maps showing all present and past railroads in the Chicago area. Also shown are present and past railroad junctions, crossings, and towers. In Illinois, also shown are present and past railroad roundhouses and turntables.

RAILROAD MAPS (MIDWEST CITIES)

Maps showing present and past railroads in the most important cities in the Midwest. Also shown are present and past railroad stations, junctions crossings and towers.

LOST STATIONS IN THE MIDWEST

Maps showing known discontinued intercity and commuter passenger railroad stations in the Midwest.

THE GREAT UNION STATIONS AND THEIR TRAINS

Information on present and classic stations in America's larger cities, including brief histories, their locations, and with zoomable Google Maps. Included are sample departures and arrivals of trains during various eras.

AMTRAK CONNECTING RAILROADS

The most interesting locations throughout the country where Amtrak trains switch between different lines. Whether track consolidations due to one railroad's merger, or switching between different railroads in order to best form a national passenger rail system.


Much information on old station and other structure locations is from the "Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps", which is a fascinating and valuable resource in determining exactly what buildings were where, historically. For Illinois, people with a Chicago Public Library card can access these maps online at the Chicago Public Library Web site. For Indiana, these maps are available online at the Indiana University Sanborn Maps web site. For Michigan and Wisconsin and additional states, these maps are available online at the Library Of Congress Sanborn Maps web site.

Additional information is from various railroad track charts, along with the Historic Aerials Web site. And historical information is from various railroad annual reports, state regulatory commission reports, and issues of Railway Age and related publications. Information is incomplete, and any further information would be appreciated. Bill Vandervoort