CHICAGO INTERURBANS


When one thinks of an electric interurban railway, one usually thinks of the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad (South Shore Line), generally regarded as "America's Last Interurban". One also thinks of the Chicago North Shore and Milwaukee Railroad (North Shore Line), and the Chicago Aurora and Elgin Railroad, two lines which unfortunately became victims of post World War II expressway construction.


WHAT IS AN INTERURBAN?

Comparing electric interurban railways and "steam railroads". The three major interurbans entering Chicago were not typical interurban lines, enabling them to survive well beyond the 1930's, when most interurban lines were abandoned.

SOUTH SHORE LINE

"America's Last Interurban" continues to operate between Chicago and South Bend, Indiana.

NORTH SHORE LINE

Operated until 1963 between Chicago and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

CHICAGO AURORA AND ELGIN

Operated until 1957 west of Chicago.

SAMUEL INSULL

These three major interurban lines entering Chicago were once controlled by Samuel Insull, who also controlled various electric companies including Chicago's Commonwealth Edison, along with other interurban lines in Indiana, and the Chicago Rapid Transit Co.

Insull acquired control of the Chicago North Shore & Milwaukee Railroad Co. in 1916, the Chicago Aurora & Elgin Railroad Co. in 1926, and the Chicago South Shore & South Bend Railroad in 1925. Insull resigned from control of all companies in 1932.


MORE TYPICAL INTERURBAN LINES

The more traditional interurban lines were more local in nature, and were basically extensions of city streetcar lines into the country, and on to other cities. Such lines typically ran alongside country roads, which generally were not paved at the time. But the paving of such roads in the 1920's and 1930's made the local interurban lines obsolete, with buses able to do the job more economically.

SUBURBAN CHICAGO

The first local transit routes in Chicago's suburbs were electric railways, including streetcar and interurban lines. Nearly all of these routes were replaced with buses during the 1930's, evolving to today's Pace bus system.

NORTHERN ILLINOIS (BEYOND CHICAGO)

Local interurban lines did once extend beyond the Chicago area into northern Illinois. But outside the 6 county Chicago metropolitan area, public transit agencies were never approved, and local and interurban public transportation disappeared entirely.

INTERURBAN LINES BEYOND NORTHERN ILLINOIS

Some of America's most comprehensive interurban railway networks existed in the Midwest states beyond Chicago.

INTERURBAN LINES BEYOND THE MIDWEST

Beyond the Midwest, the development of interurban lines was generally quite fragmented, except in the densely populated northeastern United States, where many local electric railways existed and interconnected.

HOW DID THE INTERURBANS DIE?

The interurban industry is one of the most unsuccessful industries to ever exist in America. Included are misconceptions and myths, and what really happened to interurban transportation.


INTERCITY BUSES

Many of the interurban railway companies provided supplemental, and eventually replacement bus service for the railway service. Many of these bus operations eventually evolved to Greyhound and other intercity bus companies.


INTERURBAN LINKS

Additional Web sites containing information on these and other electric railway lines.


INTERURBAN JOURNEYS (PAST)

An informal look at the question: How far can one travel, strictly using these electric railways of the past?


INTERURBAN JOURNEYS (PRESENT)

A similarly informal look at the question: How far can one presently travel, using only local transportation systems?


Information contained on this site is unofficial. Any suggestions for additions and improvements to this site are welcome. Thanks for visiting! Bill Vandervoort


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