RAILWAYS IN SCANDINAVIA

(DENMARK/NORWAY/SWEDEN)

TRAIN SERVICES AND STATIONS

Scandinavia basically consists of three countries in northern Europe, which have a long history of cooperation. At the border crossings between these countries, customs formalities were non existent long before customs formalities were eliminated at most borders within Europe. These three countries have a single national airline, SAS. But each country still has its own national railway.

Denmark is served by Danske Statsbaner (DSB), Norway is served by Norges Statsbaner (NSB), and Sweden is served by Statens Jarnvagar (SJ). For each country, the name translates into that country's "State Railways".

Covered here are the train operations at the stations in the capital and largest city in each Scandinavian country, including track numbers and services typically departing from each track. Typical track assignments are sometimes very general, and are most typical during middays.

Included are links to zoomable Google Maps for the stations. Maps include markings identifying the direction of the various lines, along with regional stations near the junctions with various lines. By zooming into the areas around the junction stations, one can see where the various lines diverge. Also included are English language Wikipedia links for each station, containing further information and history.

Danish State Railways - official DSB Web site, English home page.

Norwegian State Railways - official NSB Web site, English home page.

Swedish State Railways - official SJ Web site, English home page.

Track Maps - fan web site based in the Denmark including track diagrams of various European railways. English is available.


PRINCIPAL PASSENGER ROUTES

This list is somewhat arbitrary, highlighting express and international routes.

DENMARK
Copenhagen-Fredericia
Fredericia-Arhus-Alborg-Frederikshavn
Fredericia-Esbjerg
Fredericia-Padborg-Flensburg (Germany)
Copenhagen-Helsingor
Copenhagen-Malmo (Sweden)
Copenhagen-Rodby (ferry to Germany)
NORWAY
Oslo-Trondheim-Bodo
Oslo-Bergen
Oslo-Stavanger
Oslo-Goteborg (Sweden)
SWEDEN
Stockholm-Goteborg
Stockholm-Malmo
Stockholm-Gavle-Sundsvall-Umea-Boden-Kiruna-Narvik (Norway)


SCANDINAVIAN STATIONS

Copenhagen

Oslo

Stockholm


SCANDINAVIAN RAILWAYS EXPLAINED
Brief history and explanation of Scandinavian railway services.

Main lines in Norway and Sweden are electrified at 15,000 volts AC, overhead. In Denmark, the Copenhagen "S-Tog" or S-Train suburban network had been electrified at 1,500 volts DC, overhead. The main line trains in Denmark continued to be all diesel operated, until the first main line electrification opened in 1986. Although Denmark is located between Sweden and Germany, both using 15,000 volts AC, DSB adopted the more modern 25,000 volts AC overhead system for its main lines. Some Copenhagen S-Tog lines parallel the main lines, using separate trackage remaining at 1,500 volts DC.

Right hand operation is used in Denmark and Norway, while left hand operation is used in Sweden. In 1967, Sweden became the final Continental European country to adopt right hand driving for road traffic. While the British Isles continue to use left hand driving.

The various Scandinavian languages use various symbols with certain vowels, used to alter the pronunciation of that vowel. But because of compatibility problems with most web browsers, those symbols are omitted.

In most cities for through stations, lines are primarily organized according to the basic direction from the station. For each end of the station, lines are sorted by direction radiating from the station, in theory from lowest to highest station track numbers. And in some but not all cases, station track assignments may typically be accordingly, in order to minimize route conflicts outside the station.

Typical track assignments are sometimes very general, and are most typical during middays. Terminating or reversing trains often involve less typical track assignments.